Tag Archives: representations of disability in theatre

The Necessity of Diverse Voices in Theatre Regarding Disability and Difference: Howlround

The Necessity of Diverse Voices in Theatre Regarding Disability and Difference. Excerpt from an essay for Howlround:

Theatre could be defined as the study of what it is to be human. For millennia we have come to sit communally—a group of human beings watching another group of human beings pretending to be other human beings. We are endlessly fascinated with each other, yet a place purported to be about the range of human possibility has for too long been circumscribed and limited, especially towards almost a fifth of the population. Statistics vary, depending on definitions of “disability,” but the World Health Organization estimates 15 percent of the world population as being disabled, whilst a 2012 US Census Bureau estimate brought the figure in at just over 19 percent of the American population.

For thousands of years in the Western theatrical tradition, the atypical body has been used to scare, warn, explain, and explore human frailty, mortality, and the human condition. Disability has been a metaphor for the non-disabled to explore their fears and embedded societal values.

Since the Ancient Greeks disabled characters have appeared in plays, but seldom have the writers been disabled or written from that embodied or political perspective. The vast majority of disabled characters in the Western canon are tropes, and not only that, they reify notions of “normalcy” rather than broadening the lens and embracing all the possibilities of human variety. These misrepresentations are so prevalent in Western culture that negative representations of impairment and associations have become ingrained. Strange untruths have therefore been created and recycled in our dramas for stage and screen, and the rich, rewarding reality of disabled peoples’ lives has been replaced with problematic representations which work to keep us different, “special,” and apart. This “othering” of difference (which also includes sexual preference, cultural heritage, belief system, and so on) provides a “useful” slide rule against which notions of “being normal” and “fitting in” can be measured. These distorted ideas enshrined in our entertainment media legitimize the negative attitudes that can lead to discrimination and hate crime.

Richard Rieser in his teaching guide to disability and moving image media, published by Disability Equality in Education, gives an example of how the limited narratives and visual lexicon impacts on people’s consciousness and actions. He focuses on Disney’s Hunchback of Notre Dame, noting how after its release in the UK the previously archaic term “hunchback” reentered common parlance as a derogatory term directed at disabled people. At the same time, The British Scoliosis Society complained to the then minister of Disabled People, Nicholas Scott, about a sudden increase in violent physical attacks against its members—over 100 attacks in the six months following the film’s release, when in the six months previous to this, there had been none.

Images and narratives in our entertainment media help form the mirror reflecting our society, through which, it could be argued, we gain a sense of community, morality, and self. Without a diversity of voices, perspectives, and experiences, prevailing negative attitudes and values remain entrenched and go unchallenged.

Thankfully change is coming, albeit slowly, with more disabled and d/Deaf artists coming to the fore across art forms. This is partly the fruit of the UK and US disability civil rights movements, out of which disability arts and culture grew, and the disability arts forums, organizations, and festivals that supported and still encourage this growth. In the UK it is also down to initiatives such as Unlimited, a funding strand keen to promote, commission, and implant the work of disabled and Deaf artists in the “mainstream” on a level never experienced before.

As a playwright and dramaturg who identifies as disabled, I have been working for several decades across and between so-called “mainstream” culture and what I coin “crip” culture, informed by the social model of disability. I consider disability a social construct—I am a woman with a sensory and physical impairment, but it is society’s attitudinal and physical barriers which is disabling, not the idiosyncrasies of my body.

In my work I am interested in creating new protagonists, with different narratives, and with different endings—and to challenge and expand the actual theatre languages at play in live performance through my engagement with the aesthetics of access. I believe reimagining disability opens up creative possibilities in aesthetics, form, and content—changing the stories we tell, how they are told, and the people who tell them.

To read the rest of the article, please go to Howlround

This essay first appeared on 2nd July 2017 at: http://howlround.com/the-necessity-of-diverse-voices-in-theatre-regarding-disability-and-difference

http://bit.ly/2sxogRc

Art/Works to host Kaite O’Reilly 21-24 February 2014, Cork.

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Art|Works UCC is delighted to present playwright and dramaturg Kaite O’Reilly in a series of events including:
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Rehearsed reading of ‘Cosy’ 
Directed by Phillip Zarrilli, followed by wine reception

Saturday, February 22nd (5  7pm), Triskel Arts Centre, Cork

Cynthia Mackowick-Traun

Cynthia Mackowick-Traun

Kaite O’Reilly’s new work-in-progress play, Cosy, is a dark comedic tour-de-force written for six female performers ranging across three generations. Set in a dilapidated house, the estranged family gather —for the matriarch Rose wants to die. (Secretly) failed businesswoman Camille and her precociously intelligent teenage daughter, Isabella, arrive to find the house falling down around their ears and Ed, the elder sister/house-keeper isolated and old before her time. Then the much-traveled, many times divorced Gloria arrives, but the black sheep of the family is transformed – and who is the strange woman taking refuge in the garden shed?  The play explores family dynamics, issues of inheritance and self-ownership, and how to ‘keep the faith’ in the midst of economic chaos.

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“Do one thing every day that scares you.”  Get over the fear and start writing: A two day intensive with playwright Kaite O’Reilly.

(By application only)

Saturday, February 22nd & Sunday 23rd February

Triskel Arts Centre, Cork

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Lunchtime lecture:

 Neither Richard, nor Oedipus nor (Tiny) Tim. Dominant and Alternative Representations of Disability in Drama

Monday, February 24th (1 – 2pm), G1O Brookfield health Sciences Complex, UCC

Throughout the western dramatic tradition impairment has been a metaphor for the human condition. But what ‘truths’ have these metaphors generated and what might be alternative contemporary images and narratives?

In this lecture Kaite will briefly discuss the long cultural and linguistic practice of assigning meaning to the impaired body, and offer alternative representations, including from her own work ‘peeling’ and ‘The Almond and the Seahorse.’


 Lecture to mark Disability Awareness Week UCC

Disability Arts and Culture: “NOTHING ABOUT US WITHOUT US”

A personal odyssey through the UK’s Disability Civil Rights Movement to ‘crip’ culture and disability arts.

 Monday, February 24th (5 – 7pm), venue TBC

 


For further information or enquiries please contact:

Dr Bernadette Cronin
Lecturer, Drama & Theatre Studies
School of Music and Theatre
College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences
University College Cork
+353 (0) 21 490 4070
b.cronin@ucc.ie

Dr Rachel MagShamhráin
Lecturer, German
O’Rahilly Building (1.41)
University College Cork
+353 (0) 21 490 2689
r.magshamhrain@ucc.ie

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Kaite O’Reilly has won various awards for her work, including the Peggy Ramsay Award for YARD (Bush Theatre, London), MEN Best Play of the year for Perfect (Contact Theatre), a finalist of the 2009 International Susan Smith Blackburn Award for The Almond and the Seahorse (Sherman Cymru) and the 2010/11 winner of The Ted Hughes Award for New Work in Poetry for her retelling of Aeschylus’sPersians (National Theatre Wales). Productions in 2012 included LeanerFasterStronger (Chol/Sheffield Theatres) part of the Cultural Olympiad and In Water I’m Weightless (National Theatre Wales), an Unlimited Commission, part of the official festival at The Southbank Centre for the 2012 London Olympic and Paralympic Games. She works between ‘mainstream’ and disability arts and culture, and is a Fellow of Freie University’s International Research Centre, Interweaving Performance Cultures in Berlin, where she is reflecting on her work. She is currently completing her first novel, and working on a commission from Sherman Cymru, Forest Forge, and Little Brother Productions. Woman of Flowers tours nationally in 2014, and The 9 Fridas has its Mandarin premiere at Taipei’s International Theatre Festival in August 2014.

Phillip Zarrilli is internationally known as a director, actor, and actor-trainer. He is the founding Artistic Director of The Llanarth Group (2000). He directed the premiere of Kaite O’Reilly’s critically acclaimed The Almond and the Seahorse for Sherman Cymru.

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Deaf and disabled actors wanted – RSC and National Theatre general auditions

Those who know my work within disability arts and Deaf culture, or have been following this blog for some time, will know my position on casting and the (mis)representations of disability on stage.

https://kaiteoreilly.wordpress.com/2011/11/08/cripping-up-is-the-twenty-first-century-answer-to-blacking-up-peeling-and-the-d-monologues/

https://kaiteoreilly.wordpress.com/2012/08/30/theatre-has-to-get-to-get-over-itself-and-put-crips-in-its-scripts-guardian-comment-is-free/

Cast of 'In Water I'm Weightless' by O'Reilly, National Theatre Wales/Southbank Centre 2012, part of the Cultural Olympiad

Cast of ‘In Water I’m Weightless’ by O’Reilly, National Theatre Wales/Southbank Centre 2012, part of the Cultural Olympiad

I’ve posted up various provocations about ‘cripping up’ (non-disabled actors impersonating various physical and sensory impairments) and the necessity of playwrights to, as Lisa Hammond put it, ‘put crips in scripts.’ Now my heart sings (or I’m at least encouraged) to see the National theatre in London giving out a call for disabled and Deaf actors for general auditions in January 2014.

http://www.nationaltheatre.org.uk/discover-more/welcome-to-the-national-theatre/about-the-national-theatre/studio/deaf-and-disabled

Time will tell if this is lip service, but meanwhile…. the deadline for application approached on Monday 2nd December 2013…..  So what are you waiting for? Go apply!

Deaf and Disabled Actors – General Theatre Auditions 2014

The National Theatre and the Royal Shakespeare Company in association with a number of freelance Casting Directors from across the field of theatre are opening applications for general auditions with Deaf and Disabled actors in January 2014.

Applicants should be professional actors identifying as Deaf or Disabled, who have either undertaken vocational training, or have undertaken paid stage work in the business.

Successful applicants will have the opportunity to perform a monologue or duologue from a modern or classical play of their choosing in front of a range of theatre casting directors, and to attend a Q&A with a panel of theatre industry professionals.

Application deadline: Monday 2nd December
Successful applicants will be informed during the week of 16th December
Auditions will take place on Monday 6th January (10am-8pm) and Tuesday 7th January (10am-6pm) in Central London (please specify any non-availability over these two days in your application form)
Q&A: Tuesday 7th January 6.30pm – 8pm

How to Apply

Download the application form from their website (link, above)

Email your completed application form, acting CV and headshot to rscntauditions@gmail.com by Monday 2nd December
Postal applications should be addressed to RSC NT Auditions, Casting Department, National Theatre, London SE1 9PX
For applicants without email access please contact Charlotte on 020 7452 3448

The National Theatre Studio is fully accessible, however please inform us of any additional requirements you may have on the day on your application form.

If you have any queries please contact Charlotte on 020 7452 3448

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