One hundred and fifty ‘rules’ for writing fiction:129-132.

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Jet lagged from working in Singapore, here’s some further pieces of advice from the great and the good, whilst I recuperate and formulate a blog on my trip…

129).  In the planning stage of a book, don’t plan the ending. It has to be earned by all that will go before it.  (Rose Tremain)

130).  When I’m in writing mode for a novel, I get up at 4:00 am and work for five to six hours. In the afternoon, I run for 10km or swim for 1500m (or do both), then I read a bit and listen to some music. I go to bed at 9:00 pm. I keep to this routine every day without variation. The repetition itself becomes the important thing; it’s a form of mesmerism. I mesmerize myself to reach a deeper state of mind.  (Haruki Murakami)

131).  Moving around is good for creativity: the next line of dialogue that you desperately need may well be waiting in the back of the refrigerator or half a mile along your favorite walk.  (Will Shetterly)

132).  Writing is finally a series of permissions you give yourself to be expressive in certain ways. To invent. To leap. To fly. To fall. To be strict without being too self-excoriating. Not stopping too often to think it’s going well (or not too badly), simply to keep rowing along.  (Susan Sontag)

2 responses to “One hundred and fifty ‘rules’ for writing fiction:129-132.

  1. Love the Murakami quote. I think schedules prepare your mind to write, too. The Sontag quote is beautiful. Thanks for sharing!!!

  2. Thanks for the engagement, Melanie. I’m a compulsive hoarder of quotations and it’s great to have an outlet for sharing some of these comments I’m gathered over the years – good to know they have resonance with others, too… (my family always thought me rather eccentric jotting down these sentences from interviews, etc, but I find them so useful and at times a solace…). Hope your writing is going well!

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